The African Law Service

The African Law Service brings diverse commentary on legal developments from across our African continent. 

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Secularism in Ghana "obviously" encourages state accommodation of religion and religious identity - Supreme Court

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As part of Ghana’s 60th anniversary celebrations in 2017, the president, Nana Akufo-Addo, turned the first sod for a major national symbolic structure – the Ghana National Cathedral. To be funded by individuals and organisations within the Christian community, the cathedral is said by the government to be a priority project. But it is not without its critics.

Court tells Ugandan Law Council: ad hoc decisions about admission to practice wrong and must stop

 

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At the heart of this case stands a forlorn, would-be advocate. Ugandan Tony Katungi is keen to join the profession but he found that the Law Council put obstacles in his way, delaying access to the profession and making it more difficult and more expensive.

Reaction to shock suspension of Nigeria's Chief Justice

International and local outrage has followed the shock suspension of Nigeria’s chief justice, Walter Onnoghen, by the country’s president, Muhammadu Buhari on January 25, 2019.

Lawyers across Nigeria held a two-day protest against what they termed the “illegal suspension” of the CJ, boycotting the courts for the duration of the demonstration. The protest was called for by the Nigerian Bar Association following a national emergency meeting called to consider the suspension, and it was widely observed.

Zim judge presiding in controversial Lesotho murder trials, starts work

A string of controversial murder trials is about to get under way in Lesotho, under several foreign judges chosen to ensure that the cases are seen as unbiased.

Judge Charles Hungwe from Zimbabwe was the first of the judges to arrive in Lesotho late January. He has responsibility for drawing up the roll of cases for each of the foreign judges to hear. The cases are particularly sensitive because they involve senior military and political figures, either as victims or as assassins – or both.

Namibian lawyer tells national police chief: protect my client against abduction, rendition by Zim police  

A prominent legal firm in Namibia has written to that country’s inspector general of police asking for action to protect a senior Zimbabwe opposition figure, Chalton Hwende, on holiday in Namibia. Human rights lawyer, Norman Tjombe, told Jifa that his client, still safe in Namibia at the moment, had received credible information that members of Zimbabwe’s intelligence agency, the much-feared Central Intelligence Organisation, had arrived in Namibia intent on abducting him and taking him back to Zimbabwe.

Bucking regional trend, Zim court gives go-ahead to sue for adultery

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Zimbabwe is burning, its social fabric in tatters as fatal political violence rages through the cities and countryside. But for a woman known only as AD, there are other priorities: her husband’s adultery and what the courts are going to do about it.

After discovering the alleged affair, AD brought a damages claim against the woman she identified as her husband’s partner in illicit sex, and is suing her for USD150 000

Death penalty overturned for woman who murdered, dismembered husband

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The facts of the case before Uganda’s Supreme Court were just about as bad as they could be.

The accused murdered her 65-year-old husband and when family and others asked where he was she pretended that she did not know. She even told their daughter that he “had other women” and might be with one of them.

Villagers' water pollution case should be heard in UK not Zambia, court hears

FOR almost 2000 villagers in Zambia’s Chingola region, this was a crucial week. A two-day hearing in the English courts could see them finally able to act against the mining outfit they claim has, since 2005, polluted their water and damaged their health, their lands and any prospect of earning a living.

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