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International Criminal Justice in Africa, 2017

CONTENTS

List of editors and authors............................................................................... v

List of abbreviations ...................................................................................... vii

List of cases..................................................................................................... xi

List of legal instruments.................................................................................. xv

Three New Judges Elected to the African Court on Human and Peoples' Rights; VP Justice Ben Kioko Re-elected for Second Term

Arusha, 13 July 2018: The just-ended 31st African Union (AU) Heads of State and Government Ordinary Session in Nouakchott, Mauritania, has appointed three Judges as members of the African Court and re-appointed one Judge to serve for a final six year term.

The three newly elected Judges are: Hon Imani Aboud from Tanzania; Hon Stella Isibhakhomen Anukam from Nigeria and Hon Blaise Tchikaye from Congo.

Hon Justice Ben Kioko from Kenya, the current Vice President of the African Court, was re-appointed for a second term of six years.

Indigenousness and peoples’ rights in the African human rights system: situating the Ogiek judgement of the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights

In May 2017, the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights delivered its first indigenous rights case dealing with the expulsion of the Ogiek from their ancestral lands in the Kenyan Mau forest. The article highlights the judgement’s most interesting features in light of the ongoing debates surrounding indigenousness and indigenous rights in Africa.

Self-determination in the Case Law of the African Commission: Lessons for Europe

Looking at self-determination in contemporary Europe, one finds self-determination lumped together with the question of a possible right to remedial secession, either passionately defended or fervently rejected. Lumping self-determination and secession together tends to reduce self-determination to a territorial meaning. Such a territorial meaning indicates a larger geographical bias in international law.