Immigration law

Gay 'spouses' case: Namibia's high court urges supreme court to change its mind

In a most unusual judgment, a full bench of Namibia’s high court has spelled out its strong disagreement with a decision made 21 years ago by that country’s highest court – and has urged the presently constituted Supreme Court to reconsider its views on the matter. The case, crucial for the country’s LGB community, and for human rights more broadly, concerned two same-sex couples (both couples involved one Namibian and one non-Namibian partner) ranged against the immigration authorities.

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If ever there was a judgment that teaches the necessity for a reader to go beyond the text of the order, this is it.

ZIMBABWEAN IMMIGRANT BRINGS ABOUT LEGAL CHANGE IN THE UK

AFRICANS abroad sometimes make legal headlines – and even new law – while they are away from home. Carmel Rickard writes about a Zimbabwean in the UK whose landmark cases shows that judges may have to remind officials that the law is about nothing if not the truth.

THE man behind this extraordinary story is a 30-year-old Zimbabwean, known only as “JM”. Born HIV-positive, he struggled with health issues until, in 2002, he became really sick and his aunt advised him to go the UK and seek treatment there.

When he arrived, he said he was there for a holiday – clearly not true, said the court later, since he had gone for the clear purpose of finding treatment.

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