judicial independence

Judicial independence infringed when Uganda's Chief Justice has to 'plead' for funds - constitutional court

Uganda’s constitutional court has found that the independence of the country’s judiciary is in jeopardy because of the way the budget of this arm of government is handled. In one of its most significant decisions under the present constitution, the court said the system made the judiciary very much the junior branch in the three arms of government, and often reduced the Chief Justice ‘to pleading for funds from the executive’.

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In this landmark case the Uganda law society made an alarming claim: the country’s executive and legislature had failed to help the judicial arm of government take its rightful place under the constitution. In doing so, they undermined the independence of the judiciary.

Uganda judiciary to hold court in refugee camps; warn police on judicial independence

It has been a busy time for Uganda's judiciary, in the media for contrasting reasons. The judiciary put its collective foot down after police summonsed a magistrate in connection with a case he had heard and which the police were also investigating.

Uganda’s judiciary, through its acting chief registrar, has reacted strongly to an almost unheard-of event: police investigators have summoned a judicial officer in connection with a case he has handled.

A statement issued earlier this week on behalf of ‘the judiciary’ of Uganda, refers to a media report entitled, ‘Magistrate summoned over controversial land eviction order’.

Judge Mathilda Twomey of Seychelles to step down as Chief Justice

Unlike many presidents who seek extensions of a constitutionally-mandated limited term of office, the chief justice of Seychelles, Mathilda Twomey, has honoured her commitment to just one five-year term and will step down later this year. Speaking at the opening of the supreme court’s 2020 legal year, the chief justice spoke passionately about judicial independence and the courage required to exercise true independence.

The five-year term of Chief Justice Mathilda Twomey has been tumultuous. As well as the many changes she was determined to make in the way the justice system operated in Seychelles, she had extremely difficult personal challenges to overcome on the Bench.

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