law reporting

Law reporting at the African Court on Human and People’s Rights: Aspirations and Challenges (Part II)

In this second of a two-part blog, legal scholar Yuzuki Nagakoshi reflects on recent training at the African Court on Human and Peoples' Rights.

Without formal law reports, the public and legal professionals would have limited access to the law. In common law jurisdictions, where decisions are binding, it is essential that they are made widely available. This would ensure consistency in case law and fairness of the judicial process, and it would also make sure that the public is not ambushed by secret or inconsistent laws.

Law reporting at the African Court on Human and People’s Rights: Aspirations and Challenges (Part I)

In this first of a two-part blog, legal scholar Yuzuki Nagakoshi reflects on recent training at the African Court on Human and Peoples' Rights. Offered jointly by the African Legal Information Institute, the Judicial Institute for Africa, based at the University of Cape Town, and by Kenya Law, the course was intended to provide a comprehensive theoretical and practical training in traditional and digital law reporting.

When we think about courts, our imagination often ends when the decision is delivered.

A less public but nevertheless important aspect of courts’ work is the subsequent reporting of decisions after they have been delivered. The resulting law reports are collections of decisions from a specific court or jurisdiction, edited and organised to facilitate the understanding and dissemination of its jurisprudence and to be the official record.

AfricanLII and Kenya Law

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