Zambia

Zambian farmers head to UK courts for fight with international company over polluted water

Thousands of Zambian farmers, wanting to claim against a multinational giant for allegedly polluting their water with copper mining effluent, will have their day in court – in the United Kingdom. The UK’s Supreme Court this week ruled that the farmers could sue Vedanta and its Zambian subsidiary, Konkola Copper Mines, in the UK. The decision has been hailed as having the potential to affect many other cases involving international companies exploiting third world minerals and gas.

Read the judgment

WHEN the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom handed down its unanimous judgment in the case of Vedanta v Lungowe this week, the decision instantly became the most-discussed issue in that part of social media concerned with international human rights.

Villagers' water pollution case should be heard in UK not Zambia, court hears

A major case on the environmental and human rights of villagers in Zambia was heard in the English courts over two days this week. The appeal concerns the question of where villagers, suing over the pollution of their water via mining action, may bring their dispute. They want the case heard in the UK while Vedanta, the parent company they are targeting, says the “natural forum” for the matter would be Zambia.

FOR almost 2000 villagers in Zambia’s Chingola region, this was a crucial week. A two-day hearing in the English courts could see them finally able to act against the mining outfit they claim has, since 2005, polluted their water and damaged their health, their lands and any prospect of earning a living.

Why the long wait for Zambia's supreme court death penalty decision?

After a cattle-rustling raid into Zambia by uniformed Angolan soldiers armed with assault rifles, a local man has been convicted and sentenced to death. It is an unusual case for several reasons: armed border raids seldom result in a conviction, for example. But it is also significant because it shows the Supreme Court, Zambia's highest legal forum, taking more than four years to deliver judgment.

Read judgment here

WHEN a group of armed and uniformed Angolan soldiers crossed into Zambia on 27 April 2000, kidnapped some local people and forced them to help drive their own cattle back over the border, few would have imagined anything would come of it.

And yet, some time later, one of the cattle rustlers – a man well known in the Zambian border area where the incident took place – was arrested, charged, tried and sentenced to death.

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