Zimbabwe

Namibian lawyer tells national police chief: protect my client against abduction, rendition by Zim police  

As the crisis in human rights and the rule of law continues in Zimbabwe, its impact – and growing condemnation of the government crackdown – has spread elsewhere in the region and abroad. In Namibia, an opposition MP, visiting from Zimbabwe, fears for his life after receiving information that a squad of Zimbabwe’s Central Intelligence Organisation police have arrived in Namibia to abduct him. He believes the aim of the secret mission is to return him to Zimbabwe and put him on trial for treason.

A prominent legal firm in Namibia has written to that country’s inspector general of police asking for action to protect a senior Zimbabwe opposition figure, Chalton Hwende, on holiday in Namibia. Human rights lawyer, Norman Tjombe, told Jifa that his client, still safe in Namibia at the moment, had received credible information that members of Zimbabwe’s intelligence agency, the much-feared Central Intelligence Organisation, had arrived in Namibia intent on abducting him and taking him back to Zimbabwe.

Bucking regional trend, Zim court gives go-ahead to sue for adultery

Flaring political passions in the region continue to make news headlines, but the courts have been hearing about other kinds of passion as well. While Zimbabwe is alight with raging political conflict, and while citizens die at the hands of the police and security forces, the judiciary has been dealing with the burning issues of sex, adultery and maintaining the country’s “moral standards”. In a recent decision, the high court in Harare has held that a damages claim for adultery may go ahead.

Read the judgment here

Zimbabwe is burning, its social fabric in tatters as fatal political violence rages through the cities and countryside. But for a woman known only as AD, there are other priorities: her husband’s adultery and what the courts are going to do about it.

After discovering the alleged affair, AD brought a damages claim against the woman she identified as her husband’s partner in illicit sex, and is suing her for USD150 000

Law society meets with Chief Justice over torture, crackdown in Zimbabwe

Security forces in Zimbabwe are continuing to use torture and deadly force against people protesting against government restrictions and fuel hikes that have made petrol in that country the highest-priced in the world. Alarming pictures of security forces beating protesters shown round the world forced President Emmerson Mnangagwa, on an international visit to drum up foreign investment, to return before his original date, and take control of the situation. But little has changed since he arrived home earlier this week and the violent crackdown is continuing.

[Photo Philimon Reuters]

As the brutal government crackdown continues in Zimbabwe, against protesters and anyone suspected of being in opposition to the ruling party, official presidential spokesperson George Charamba told the media that the opposition Movement for Democratic Change was to blame for the sharp increase in violence that has marked the last few weeks in Zimbabwe. He also said that the brutality experienced by the people of the country was just a “foretaste of things to come”.

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