Constitutional right of free assembly

Muwanga Kivumbi v Attorney General (1) (Constitutional Petition 9 of 2005) [2008] UGCC 34 (27 May 2008)

This petition challenged the constitutionality of section 32 of the Police Act (Cap 303). The section empowered the Inspector General of Police (IGP) to prohibit the convening of any assembly or procession on any public road, street or any place of public resort, if the IGP had reasonable grounds to believe the assembly or procession was likely to cause a breach of the peace.

Muwanga Kivumbi v Attorney General (Constitutional Appeal 6 of 2011) [2017] UGSC 4 (14 February 2017);

The appellant had filed a petition in the Constitutional Court challenging the constitutionality of section 32 of the Police Act (Cap 303). The section empowered the Inspector General of Police (IGP) to prohibit the convening of any assembly or procession on any public road, street or any place of public resort, if the IGP had reasonable grounds to believe the assembly or procession was likely to cause a breach of the peace.

Kiiza Besigye v Civil Aviation Authority & Anor (Civil Suit 732 of 2016) [2019] UGHCCD 39 (15 March 2019);

The plaintiff was arrested by the Ugandan Aviation Police (AVPOL) at Entebbe Airport while on his way to meet his political supporters. He sought declarations that the defendants, the Civil Aviation Authority (1st defendant) and the Attorney General (2nd defendant) violated his right to freedom from torture, cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment; the right to freedom of movement, assembly and association as guaranteed in articles 20, 24, 29 and 50 of the Constitution of Uganda.

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